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Renee Robbins Original Works on Paper "Stomatopod" at salonlb.
Stomatopod
Stomatopod
Stomatopod
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Stomatopod

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$100.00
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$100.00
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RENEE ROBBINS | Works on Paper

Stomatopod, 2013

Materials: Etching & aquatint

Dimensions: 9" x 7.25" Unframed 

printed by the artist at Spudnik Press

" Stomatopods, or Mantis Shrimp, have one of the most advanced abilities to see color. Our eyes contain millions of light-sensitive cells called rods and cones. Rods enable us to see light and motion and cones enable us to see color. Humans have 3 color-receptive cones, butterflies 5, and Stomatopods 16. Consider how many colors they must see. These beautiful creatures are only 6 – 12 inches long but are creatively violent predators. They have two raptorial appendages on the front of its body. These accelerate with the same velocity as a gunshot fired from a 22-caliber bullet. Their limbs move so quickly, the water around them boils in a process known as supercavitation. When these cavitation bubbles collapse it produces an undersea shockwave that can kill prey even if the Stomatopod misses its target. The force of these collapsing bubbles also produces temperatures in the range of several thousand Kelvins and emits tiny bursts of light. This effect is called sonoluminescence. Their limbs are so resilient; researchers have been studying their cell structure for use in the development of advanced body armor for combat troops. Aquariums don’t often house Stomatopods because they tend to slaughter every other creature they share a tank with and also because they can break aquarium glass ".